Supporting Innovation

Asia is continuing to grow as an important market for Australian businesses and navigating the food regulations in this market can be challenging – gain knowledge and information to enable you to advance in this market.

The Australian Association for Food Protection symposium will focus on current relevant and key issues to support food safety.

Innovations in food safety systems – are we there yet?  What is next is on the horizon and how do food safety systems support innovation.

Allergen management continues to be a key challenge for industry – hear the last updates with a series of short, sharp presentations from a range of perspectives.

 

 

 

Session 3.1 - Insights into Asian Regulations

Overview: Asia is continuing to grow as an important market for Australian businesses.  Navigating the food regulations in this market can be challenging. This session will provide you with knowledge and information to enable you to navigate this market. 

Chris Preston, ComplyANZ

Chris Preston has over 30 years of experience providing legal advice and services to manufacturers and brand owners regarding the regulatory regimes governing food, beverages, cosmetics, OTC pharmaceuticals and general consumer goods. He served as Director, Legal and Regulatory with the Australian Food and Grocery Council, and has advised multinational and domestic clients of all sizes in over 15 years of private legal practice. Chris will be talking in session 3.1 on Tuesday 11 September. 

Scott Bouvier, King & Wood Mallesons

Scott Bouvier advises on commercial dealings and disputes with intellectual property, technology and food/agribusiness and is co-lead of the firm’s Food and Agribusiness team. Scott is recognised as one of Australia’s leading IP lawyers. Client quotes describe Scott as “dedicated and determined, with brilliant technical legal skills”; “always available, pragmatic and prepared to give his opinion”; “focused on getting the deal done and at the vanguard of Australian patent and technology licensing”; and say that his “nuanced and creative approach to difficult trademark issues sets him apart from the pack” and he is “commercial and approachable….makes an effort to understand [clients]…the relationship is valued”. Scott will be talking in session 3.1 on Tuesday 11 September. 

Insights into Asian exporting, regulation and brand protection

This session will show you how to navigate Australian export rules and the trade barriers that can stand in the way of selling your products internationally. You will discover the essentials of international trade contracts, as well as the key issues faced when using e-commerce channels to engage with millions of consumers in growing Asian markets such as China.

We will also de-mystify the import permit and inspection requirements applicable to key Asian markets, and answer the question of whether it is possible to have one packaging label across these markets. Finally, we will showcase the types of advertising, health and product claims that you can make about your product, and teach you how to protect your brand and safeguard it against counterfeiting.

 

Lauren D’Ambrosio, King & Wood Mallesons

Lauren advises clients in the food and consumer products sectors on Food Code compliance, therapeutic goods regulation, IP, consumer law and marketing issues. Lauren advises on commercial agreements, including supply, procurement, manufacturing, sponsorship and distribution arrangements, as well as social media, franchising and IP/IT aspects of M&A transactions. Lauren will be talking in session 3.1 on Tuesday 11 September. 

Insights into Asian exporting, regulation and brand protection

This session will show you how to navigate Australian export rules and the trade barriers that can stand in the way of selling your products internationally. You will discover the essentials of international trade contracts, as well as the key issues faced when using e-commerce channels to engage with millions of consumers in growing Asian markets such as China.

We will also de-mystify the import permit and inspection requirements applicable to key Asian markets, and answer the question of whether it is possible to have one packaging label across these markets. Finally, we will showcase the types of advertising, health and product claims that you can make about your product, and teach you how to protect your brand and safeguard it against counterfeiting.

Adam Hyland, Franke Hyland

Adam is a Registered Patent and Trade Mark Attorney in Australia and New Zealand. He holds a Bachelor of Engineering (Chemical) degree, with Honours, from the University of NSW, and a Graduate Diploma in IP Law from the University of Melbourne. Before entering the patent profession, Adam spent ten years working in research and development and technical management roles in major food processing organisations, an ideal grounding for a patent attorney to devise realistic and cost-effective intellectual property strategy for a food business operating in a competitive market. Adam will be talking in session 3.1 on Tuesday 11 September.

Growing Dragons: Asia's Food IP Creators

The transformation of raw materials in to value-added, tasty and nutritious foods is a technology intensive process. And of course, the development and application of technology will give rise to the creation of valuable intellectual property (IP). This has in turn led to a greater appreciation of IP creation in the food manufacturing industry. Asia is experiencing great growth in food production capability and food innovation. This presentation shows some of the organisations that are driving the growth of food IP in the Asia-Pacific region and reveals the types of technology innovation that these ‘Food Dragons’ are creating.

 

 

Session 3.2 -  Innovation in Food Safety - AAFP Symposium

Presented by: Australian Association for Food Protection (AAFP)

Overview: This annual Symposium presented by AAFP will focus on relevant and key food safety issues.

 

Thierry Sofia, bioMérieux

Thierry Sofia is Research and Development Manager at bioMérieux. Since 1991 he has been involved in the development of many rapid microbiological methods for the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. His main achievement is the design and development of the TEMPO® system for the automated enumeration of quality indicator organisms in food and environmental samples. Thierry will be talking in session 3.2 on Tuesday 11 September. 

Innovative method for Campylobacter monitoring in the poultry industry

Campylobacter is the leading cause of foodborne disease of bacterial origin. The major source of contamination is the handling and consumption of poultry products. A new automated enumeration method has been developed to enable poultry industries to monitor levels of Campylobacter at selected steps of the slaughtering process.

Dr Scott Chandry, CSIRO

Scott completed his PhD at Albany Medical College and the New York State Department of Health. He then had the food fortune to be hired by CSIRO to work in Australia initially as a post doc now as a senior scientist and team leader in food safety. Scott will be talking in session 3.2 on Tuesday 11 September. 

Use of whole genome sequencing from a meat industry perspective

Technological and computational advances in next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) has led to whole genome sequencing (WGS) ascending toward being the "gold standard" technology for public health and food regulatory agencies around the world. Therefore, the red meat industry will be both directly and indirectly affected by the changes brought about by DNA sequencing. This will range from the impact on the genetics of animals, to soil management, pasture and crop improvements and testing / control of microbial contamination. This presentation will provide information relevant to the red meat industry’s response to the development of new genetic identification and surveillance technologies for food safety aspects of public health prompted by the advances in DNA sequencing technology.

The use of NGS technologies such as WGS is likely to result in several benefits the most important of which is superior discriminatory capabilities over current methods. It is likely that there will also be benefits related to cost, speed, and the capacity to deal with novel threats. NGS technologies and the associated computational analysis methods continue to advance rapidly which presents some challenges for industry, regulators, and government. No single globally agreed method or technology has been prescribed. Computational methods are rapidly updated and replaced so there is no unified analysis system. An overview of potential benefits and challenges for industry will be discussed in the context of several countries that have already implemented NGS and WGS technologies.  The public health sector is currently leading the implementation of NGS based analysis methods in Australia so there is potential value from input by industry.

 

Jack van der Sanden, Think Outside the Square NZ Ltd

With over 30 years' experience in the global food industry, Jack has lead the international food quality assurance team at Fonterra and is currently working as an independent consultant. Jack has managed consultancy projects in the USA, Europe and China and led the design of Fonterra's environmental Pathogen Monitoring statement. Jack will be talking in session 3.2 on Tuesday 11 September. 

Environmental Pathogen Monitoring in Food Manufacturing

Environmental Pathogen Management (EPM) is an increasingly important pre-requisite programme for food manufacturing. Whilst a large number of guidance documents for EPM have been developed, there is currently no clear, globally accepted framework for implementation. As a result, there is significant variability in the application of EPM in the global food supply chain.

The topic of this presentation is to introduce a risk based model for an EPM programme, which not only meets international guidelines and expectations but also offers a clear pathway for  the standardised implementation across a food company with multiple food manufacturing plants. The speaker has led the design and development of this risk based framework for a large multinational dairy company.

 

Dr Barbara Butow, FSANZ

Barbara’s background is in Biological and Agricultural Sciences. Before joining FSANZ in 2004, she worked as a research scientist for more than 15 years.  She has broad experience in food safety risk analysis and now leads the Microbiology and Biotechnology Section, which combines the GM and microbiology risk assessment teams. Barbara will be talking in session 3.2 on Tuesday 11 September

Striking a balance between innovation and safety in food regulation

Food safety is of paramount importance when bringing a new product to market. However, it is recognised that the regulatory requirements around the safety of a food product need to be balanced so that innovation is not stifled. This is reflected in Food Standards Australia New Zealand’s (FSANZ) core legislative objective, the protection of public health and safety, whilst ‘encouraging an efficient and internationally competitive food industry’. 

In the past 20 years, FSANZ has assessed a steady stream of innovative microbiological applications as well as many GM applications prior to approval and inclusion in the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code (the Code). Innovations in the microbiological space have generally taken the form of novel food, processing aid or food additive applications and the need for FSANZ to adapt its risk assessment methodologies. A variety of GM foods or food ingredients have been approved by FSANZ; 71 approvals for 8 different crops.

As an extension of our GM work, the Biotechnology team at FSANZ has recently started to consider how food derived using new breeding technologies should (or should not) be addressed within the Code. This is a topic at the cutting edge of innovation for scientists, industry and government regulators; the latter presenting a challenge on how to assess the safety of these technologies.

 

 

Session 3.3 - Allergens

Overview: this session will provide a series of short, sharp presentations from a range of perspectives.

 

Bill McBride

Bill is the Asia Pacific Representative for the SQF Institute and Principal of Foodlink Management Services, and has forty years of experience in food safety and quality assurance in the global food industry, including consultancy with the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI), and a number of international food companies. Bill will be presenting in session 3.3 on Wednesday 12 September.

 

Lauren Kolstad, FSANZ

Lauren joined Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) in 2008 and has managed a number of projects within the Food Safety and Response Section. Most recently Lauren is the Secretariat of the Codex Food Hygiene Electronic Working Group developing a Code of Practice for Food Allergen Management for Food Business Operators.

 

 

Dr Geoffrey Annison, AFGC

Dr Geoffrey Annison joined the AFGC in October 2007. He has wide experience in food regulation and innovation, having held several senior technical and management roles in industry in Australia and overseas, in academia, and in public policy. His career has spanned several sectors including the FMCG sector with Goodman Fielder and the AFGC, the rural sector with organisations such as Australian Pork Ltd and AWB Ltd. and research providers such as Massey University in New Zealand and the CSIRO in Australia. Dr Annison has a Bachelor of Science with Honours in Food Technology and a PhD in Microbiology from the University of New South Wales.

 

Kirsten Grinter, Nestlé

Kirsten is the Regulatory and Scientific Affairs Manager, Nestlé, where she has responsibility for a team of people who together manage regulatory and scientific affairs across the vast Oceania Business. Kirsten was instrumental in the establishment of the Allergen Bureau and has been directly involved on the Management Committee and Board since its inception in 2005. Kirsten is the inaugural and current President of the Allergen Bureau Ltd.

 

Peter Bush, FTAA

Peter Bush is the Executive Officer of the Food Technology Association of Australia (FTAA) , is a Food Technologist and a Professional member of Four Global Associations ( Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and the USA). He has worked in the Food Industry on 3 Continents and has been in Australia for the last 21 Years.

 

Lisa Warren

Lisa is a food technologist with over 20 year’s industry experience in food regulations, nutrition and product development. Working with the Allergen Bureau for four years in a VITAL® Support role, Lisa is involved in a variety of projects that will help the food industry and their increasing demand for information about allergen management and the VITAL Program. Lisa Warren also collaborates with a variety of food companies in the areas of food regulation and compliance.

 

 

 

 

Session 3.4 - Innovations in Food Safety Systems 

Overview: Auditing for SMEs; updates, processes and tips

Bill McBride, Foodlink Management Services

Bill is the Asia Pacific Representative for the SQF Institute and Principal of Foodlink Management Services, and has forty years of experience in food safety and quality assurance in the global food industry, including consultancy with the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI), and a number of international food companies. Bill will be speaking in session 3.4 on Wednesday 12 September.

Are we there yet?

From its humble beginnings three decades ago, food safety certification has grown into a major global industry.  But how successful has it been and where do we go from here?

To move forward, we need to take stock of where we’ve been and assess our successes and failures. We need to peer back into the history of food safety systems and consider the achievements, innovations and challenges within the industry. Where we are now, what works and what does not, and importantly where are we going.  What will the shape of food safety systems be in future and what will the role be of third party audits and certification? 

 

Clare Winkle, Integrity Compliance Solutions

Clare has audited against 2nd party ethical standards in ANZ & USA, the scope of these standards included OHS, worker conditions/payment/visa status, environmental & animal welfare.  Clare has developed training courses, standards/checklists for standards that covered aquaculture animal welfare, worker conditions/payment, in Australia & Ireland. Since 2012 Clare has audited against & technically reviewed reports, for Australian avian supply chain animal welfare standards & now is reviewing those standards from a whole of industry approach. Clare will be speaking in session 3.4 on Wednesday 12 September.  

Transparency and ethical business: the SMETA way

Many retailers and customers now require evidence of responsible and ethical sourcing & in some cases certification to international standards. There are a number of standards that can you can be certified against. One is: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit (SMETA).  This is a comprehensive checklist that covers the areas of: Labour conditions, Health & Safety of workers, environmental controls & ethical business practices. The standard is based on the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) base code that is in turn based on International Labour Organisation (ILO) conventions. This presentation will discuss the steps & options of implementation including audit scope & methods.  

 

Todd Redwood, BSI Group

Todd has been helping food-related businesses deliver safe, sustainable and socially responsible food to tables around the world for over 25 years. Originally a chef, and more recently working in the adult education and medical professional development sectors, Todd joined BSI Group in 2013 serving various general management roles in Australia, covering food, supply chain and operations.
Based in Sydney, Australia in his role of Global Food Operations & Compliance Director, Todd is responsible for leading all operations, compliance and governance aspects relating to Food Assurance and Training activities of BSI worldwide. Previously the Director – Food Asia Pacific based in Singapore, he was responsible for driving BSI’s food sector market entry, growth strategy as well as relationship and resource management across the Asia Pacific region. 
BSI Group helps organizations of all sizes and sectors perform better, manage their business and supply chain risks effectively and become more resilient to better stand the test of time. We do this through training as well as certifying management systems and products to local and internationally recognized best practice standards. But our work doesn’t stop there, we provide our clients with  ongoing access to the knowledge and tools that drive continual improvement.
Working in 193 countries, we pride ourselves on the expertise, integrity and professionalism of our people. Our mission is to help our 86,000 clients, ranging from high-profile global brands to small local companies, to survive and prosper in today’s world. 

The Evolution of Food Safety Management Schemes – more than just food safety

The pressure is on with the numerous stakeholders of food and beverage supply chain demanding more from food safety certification causing peak bodies and scheme owners to incorporate elements not traditionally associated with food safety but impacting food safety  outcomes. Where does food safety begin and end and what should we expect from our food safety auditors as they face this volley of additional requirements?

Tristan Kitchener, Kitchener Partners

Tristan is an ex-retailer, having previously held senior positions with Sainsbury’s (UK) and Coles supermarkets, and is now a management consultant providing advice and support along the grocery value chain, from major retailers through to manufacturers and primary producers. He has a focus upon fresh foods and was the Group Merchandise Manager, Fresh Produce, at Coles Supermarkets (2005-09). Tristan has his own consulting business, Kitchener Partners Pty Ltd, focused upon providing strategic and advisory support. Increasingly Tristan assists businesses understand the implications of the changing retail and consumer environment, and helps identify solutions to key business challenges. Tristan will be speaking in session 3.4 on Wednesday 12 September. 

The Harmonised Australian Retailer Produce Scheme (HARPS) as a platform to unite retailers to solve universal issues in the industry

The Harmonised Australian Retailer Produce Scheme (HARPS) is a retailer-led scheme designed to assist with compliance to food safety, legal and trade requirements for suppliers of whole fruit, whole vegetables and nuts in shell to the major grocery retailers in Australia. HARPS has combined the individual requirements of each of the major grocery retailers in Australia into a single scheme. Tristan Kitchener has led the project since it was initiated in 2012 and will discuss what’s required for producers and how HARPS as a business model can be used as a platform to solve wider industry issues by bringing all the major retailers together to solve ‘common issues’.